English Idiom : “From Rags to Riches”

from rags to riches english idiom definitionFrom Rags to Riches

Another fantastic English idiom to use in your English writing and speaking work. As always, this English idiom is very common and used alot by English speakers from the UK and America. Welcome to another free online English class from Wellington House Idiomas Blog, Barcelona. 

Definition of English Idioms “From Rags to Riches”

We use the English Idioms “From Rags to Riches” when we want to talk about a person who was very poor but is now very rich. Often, this idiom is used in story telling.

Rag = An old piece of material or old clothes. “He was poor and wore old rags to keep him warm.”

Rich = If you say a person is rich, you are saying they have alot of money. Rich is an adjective. When we say “Riches”, we are talking about the things a rich person has. A rich man has many riches, lots of money, many house, cars etc

Explain english idiom From rags to RichesExamples of English Idiom “From Rags to Riches”

1. Ben was born very poor, his family had no money and they lived in a small house. But he worked very hard and studied English. Ben started a business and became very rich. Ben’s life is a classic rags to riches story.

2. Sylvia was born very poor. Her family had to grow their own vegetables and ate plain rice for dinner. Luckily, her family won two million euros on the lottery and they were able to buy a beautiful house and eat at beautiful restaurants in the city of London. A true rags to riches story.

Keep coming back to the Wellington House Blog for FREE English classes online and join us on Facebook for you daily lesson!

More from wellingtonhousebcn

To Make it Count – Meaning of English Expression

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WxfZkMm3wcg?rel=0&w=853&h=480] Nike's exciting new advertising campaign is called #makeitcount - but...
Read More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

From Rags to Riches Another fantastic English idiom to use in your English writing and speaking work. As always, this English idiom is very...
" />