Practice or Practise? Desert or Dessert? Parents or Fathers? – More Common English Mistakes

Practice or Practise?

In British English, “Practice” is a noun.

e.g. A doctor works at a “Doctor’s Practice”.

“Practise” is a verb.

e.g. “I practise English every day because I want to move to England.”

Desert or Dessert?

 This is difficult because the words look and sound similar. But remember, there is a huge difference between the “Desert” and “Dessert”.

Desert = Sand, Dry Land, No Water, Hot, Too Much Sun!

Dessert = Tasty Cakes, Chocolate Pudding, Ice-Cream, Sugary Food!

NB – A good way to remember which is which, is to remember there are 2 “s” in Dessert, because it is delicious and you want more!

Parents or Fathers?

In many Latin languages, the mother and father are titles as “fathers”. This dates back many many years and is completely normal in Spanish.

But remember, in English, a father is a father and a mother is a mother. Together, they are “parents”.

It is a mistake we hear all the time and it is an easy error to correct. Just remember not to speak spanglish! 🙂

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Practice or Practise? In British English, “Practice” is a noun. e.g. A doctor works at a “Doctor’s Practice”. “Practise” is a verb. e.g. “I...
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